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babybowsers:

me: *petting a cat* nice

cat: *bathes self where i touched it*

me: image

(via thecutestofthecute)

Source: babybowsers
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hyperbemily:

reveseveilles:

nuedvixx:

Seattle/Tacoma area you better save this baby!! This is Hubert, he is a super sweet 3 year old. He is at high risk of being put down and has been in there almost a year. Miltonanimalshelter.org help this little baby out and repost/share/tell your friends!!!

I WOULD ADOPT YOU IF I WAS CLOSER OMG

NO THIS IS MY AREA WHY CAN’T I HAVE ANOTHER DOG I’M GOING TO CRY

(via thecutestofthecute)

Source: nuedvixx
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mindblowingscience:

Depression’s ‘Dimmer Switch’ Discovered

Scientists have discovered a “dimmer switch” in the brain that can not only help them better understand the brain chemistry behind mood disorders like depression, but how to treat them, too, according to new research published in the journal Science.

"The idea that some people see the world as a glass half empty has a chemical basis in the brain," senior author Roberto Malinow, said in a news release. “What we have found is a process that may dampen the brain’s sensitivity to negative life events.”
Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a control mechanism for an area of the brain that processes sensory and emotive information that humans experience as “disappointment.” Specifically, through experiments with rodents, they found that neurons feeding into a small region above the thalamus known as the lateral habenula (LHb) secrete both a common excitatory neurotransmitter, glutamate, and its opposite, the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA.
Previous studies have only identified two other systems in the brain where neurons had been observed to co-release excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters.
"Our study is one of the first to rigorously document that inhibition can co-exist with excitation in a brain pathway," explained lead author Steven Shabel. "In our case, that pathway is believed to signal disappointment."
Proper functioning of the LHb is believed to be important in much more than just disappointment. It has been implicated in regulating pain responses and a variety of motivational behaviors, and has also been linked to psychosis.
Depression, in particular, has been linked to hyperactivity of the LHb, but until this study, researchers had little evidence as to why this overstimulation occurred in some people and not others.
Researchers were also able to show that neurons of rodents with hints of human depression produced less GABA, relative to glutamate. When these animals were given an antidepressant to raise their brain’s serotonin levels, their relative GABA levels increased.
"The take-home of this study is that inhibition in this pathway is coming from an unusual co-release of neurotransmitters into the habenula," Shabel said.
"We may now have a precise neurochemical explanation for why antidepressants make some people more resilient to negative experiences."

mindblowingscience:

Depression’s ‘Dimmer Switch’ Discovered

Scientists have discovered a “dimmer switch” in the brain that can not only help them better understand the brain chemistry behind mood disorders like depression, but how to treat them, too, according to new research published in the journal Science.

"The idea that some people see the world as a glass half empty has a chemical basis in the brain," senior author Roberto Malinow, said in a news release. “What we have found is a process that may dampen the brain’s sensitivity to negative life events.”

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a control mechanism for an area of the brain that processes sensory and emotive information that humans experience as “disappointment.” Specifically, through experiments with rodents, they found that neurons feeding into a small region above the thalamus known as the lateral habenula (LHb) secrete both a common excitatory neurotransmitter, glutamate, and its opposite, the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA.

Previous studies have only identified two other systems in the brain where neurons had been observed to co-release excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters.

"Our study is one of the first to rigorously document that inhibition can co-exist with excitation in a brain pathway," explained lead author Steven Shabel. "In our case, that pathway is believed to signal disappointment."

Proper functioning of the LHb is believed to be important in much more than just disappointment. It has been implicated in regulating pain responses and a variety of motivational behaviors, and has also been linked to psychosis.

Depression, in particular, has been linked to hyperactivity of the LHb, but until this study, researchers had little evidence as to why this overstimulation occurred in some people and not others.

Researchers were also able to show that neurons of rodents with hints of human depression produced less GABA, relative to glutamate. When these animals were given an antidepressant to raise their brain’s serotonin levels, their relative GABA levels increased.

"The take-home of this study is that inhibition in this pathway is coming from an unusual co-release of neurotransmitters into the habenula," Shabel said.

"We may now have a precise neurochemical explanation for why antidepressants make some people more resilient to negative experiences."

Source: natureworldnews.com
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lensblr-network:

Sammamish River

Looking South towards Redmond, WA

IR Converted Olympus E-P2 + Panasonic 20mm f:1.7

Source: johngateley
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they-stole-my-robot:

unexplained-events:

Kryptos

Located at the CIA HQ in Virginia, Kryptos is a heavily encripted sculpture. It has four sections with messages, three of which have been decoded. The fourth section(installed 1990) remains as an unsolved code to this very day.

Once all four of the sections are decoded, they form a riddle which must then be solved for whatever the answer may be. Gathering from the solved sections, it seems they are part treasure map instructions, poems, and discussions.

Here are the three solved sections.

Section 1BETWEEN SUBTLE SHADING AND THE ABSENCE OF LIGHT LIES THE NUANCE OF IQLUSION

Section 2IT WAS TOTALLY INVISIBLE HOWS THAT POSSIBLE ? THEY USED THE EARTHS MAGNETIC FIELD X THE INFORMATION WAS GATHERED AND TRANSMITTED UNDERGRUUND TO AN UNKNOWN LOCATION X DOES LANGLEY KNOW ABOUT THIS ? THEY SHOULD ITS BURIED OUT THERE SOMEWHERE X WHO KNOWS THE EXACT LOCATION ? ONLY WW THIS WAS HIS LAST MESSAGE X THIRTY EIGHT DEGREES FIFTY SEVEN MINUTES SIX POINT FIVE SECONDS NORTH SEVENTY SEVEN DEGREES EIGHT MINUTES FORTY FOUR SECONDS WEST X LAYER TWO

Section 3SLOWLY DESPARATLY SLOWLY THE REMAINS OF PASSAGE DEBRIS THAT ENCUMBERED THE LOWER PART OF THE DOORWAY WAS REMOVED WITH TREMBLING HANDS I MADE A TINY BREACH IN THE UPPER LEFT HAND CORNER AND THEN WIDENING THE HOLE A LITTLE I INSERTED THE CANDLE AND PEERED IN THE HOT AIR ESCAPING FROM THE CHAMBER CAUSED THE FLAME TO FLICKER BUT PRESENTLY DETAILS OF THE ROOM WITHIN EMERGED FROM THE MIST X CAN YOU SEE ANYTHING Q ?

I can’t wait to see where this mystery leads.

If I’m recognizing it right, Section 3 is actually what Howard Carter wrote about his discovery of King Tut’s tomb (although anyone please correct me if I’m wrong).

(via unexplained-events)

Source: unexplained-events
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Bobby Hodges & Natasia Petracic, Sandymount, Dublin

Source: peoplecallmejim